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Hardwood | Styles

There are many variables to consider when selecting hardwood. We recommend reviewing the options below and considering which one best meets your lifestyle and taste.

Design:

  • Installation patterns: There are several options for custom installations designs. Popular examples include:
  • Running on the Diagonal

    Herringbone

  • Color: Darker woods appear more formal while natural woods give a more casual look
  • Board Width: Narrow boards expand the look of a room while wider boards are perfect for larger rooms.
    • Strips = Narrow boards; Planks = Wider boards




Hardwood Edges: 3 Types

  • Square Edge: Edges all meet squarely for a uniform, smooth surface (contemporary and formal)
  • Eased Edge: Boards slightly beveled to length and/or the end joints, hides irregularities, plank heights, also called micro-beveled edge
  • Beveled Edge: Distinctive groove, informal and country décor, beveled edges sealed completely, dirt easy to sweep or vacuum out of the grooves

Species Guide


Red Oak

White Oak

Cherry

Hickory/Pecan

Maple

Pine

Reclaimed Pine

Walnut

Mesquite

Pre-finished vs. Unfinished Hardwoods

1. Pre-finished:

  • Ready for Installation
  • Boards Pre-Sanded, Stained and Finished
  • Harder—already finished with layers of protection (see below for finish options)
  • Wider variety of wood species to choose from
  • Save Hours of labor and cleanup
  • Extended Finish Warranty

2. Unfinished/Custom:

  • Allow you to have Custom Flooring, to Match your Current Décor
    • Choose the Wood Species
  • Sanded and Stained onsite; a messy process
  • No Extended Finish Warranty

Pre-finished Options for Finish:

  • UV-cured: Cured with Ultra Violet lights versus heat
  • Polyurethane: Clear, tough and durable applied as a wear layer
  • Acrylic-Urethane: Different make up than Polyurethane, same benefits
  • Ceramic: Advanced technology allowing ceramics to increase wear layer resistance
  • Aluminum-oxide: Added to urethane finish for increased abrasion resistance
  • Acrylic Impregnated: acrylic monomers injected into cell structure for hardness, then finished with a wear layer

Floor Protection

  • UV Cured Finishes make floors easier to maintain
  • Pre-finished hardwoods often apply 6-10 coats of a Ultra-Violet (UV) Cured Urethane
  • UV Cured Urethane: difficult to duplicate on a job site finish for unfinished/custom finished hardwood
  • ***Do NOT clean your hardwood floor with a mop
    • Water is NOT a Friend of Hardwood
  • Floors won't watermark like old waxed floors

Hardness – Janka Hardness Test

  • Measures the force needed to embed a .444 inch steel ball to half its diameter in a piece of wood
  • Higher the number, the harder the wood
  • Measures the ability of wood species to withstand indentations
  • Construction and finish are also important in indicating the durability and ease of maintenance

HARDNESS RATING: From Least to Greatest

  • Douglas Fir 660
  • Southern Yellow Pine (shortleaf) 690
  • Southern Yellow Pine (longleaf) 870
  • Black Cherry 950
  • Teak 1000
  • Black Walnut 1010
  • Heart Pine 1225
  • Yellow Birch 1260
  • Red Oak (Northern) 1290
  • American Beech 1300
  • Ash 1320
  • African Pedauk 1725
  • Hickory 1820
  • Pecan 1820
  • Purpleheart 1860
  • Jarrah 1910
  • Merbau 1925
  • Santos Mahogany 2200
  • Mesquite 2345
  • Brazillian Cherry 2350
  • White Oak 1360
  • Australian Cypress 1375
  • Hard maple 1450
  • Wenge 1620

Red Oak

Red Oak is the most abundant growing species in the United States. The sapwood of Red Oak is white to light brown while the heartwood has a pinkish reddish brown tone. It comes in four different grades:

Red Oak

Quartersawn

highest quality with almost no knotholes or color deviation.
Smooth Finish suggested.

Quartersawn

Select

Second highest quality with few knotholes and very slight color deviations. Smooth finish suggested.

Select

#1 Common

Third highest quality with more pronounced knotholes and color
deviations. Suggest hand scraped or smooth.

common 1

#2 Common

Lowest quality with many knotholes and color deviations. Suggest hand scrape only.




White Oak

White Oak is similar to Red Oak but is slightly more dense and has longer rays. The sapwood is light colored and the heartwood is light to dark brown. White Oak comes in the same four grades as Red Oak:

White Oak

Quartersawn

highest quality with almost no knotholes or color deviation.
Smooth Finish suggested.

Quartersawn

Select

Second highest quality with few knotholes and very slight color deviations. Smooth finish suggested.

Select

#1 Common

Third highest quality with more pronounced knotholes and color
deviations. Suggest hand scraped or smooth.

Common 1

#2 Common

Lowest quality with many knotholes and color deviations. Suggest hand scrape only.


Cherry

Cherry

American Cherry grows primarily in the Midwestern and Eastern United States and is very hard and dense. The sapwood varies from a rich red to reddish brown and will darken with age. The sapwood tends to be a creamy white.

Hickory/Pecan

Hickory-Pecan

Hickory is the hardest, heaviest, and strongest American wood. The sapwood of hickory is white and the heartwood is pale to reddish brown. It can be finished smooth or hand scraped.

Maple

Maple

Growing in the Pacific Northwest, maple tends to be light but a very dense wood. Generally there is no marked difference between the sapwood and heartwood. Because of its density, maple is not recommended for high humidity areas. Smooth Finish suggested.

Pine

Pine

Tends to be a soft wood that absorbs moisture very well and is recommended for high humidity areas. The sapwood in pine is usually light yellowish-white while the heartwood tends to be yellowish-orange. Can be finished smooth or hand scraped.

Reclaimed Pine

Reclaimed Pine

Same characteristics as Pine, however it is recycled from old buildings (usually barns).

Walnut

Walnut

Walnut grows primarily in the Eastern United states. The sapwood tends to be white while the heartwood ranges from a deep chocolate to purplish black. Walnut is great for borders and is finished smooth.

Mesquite

Mesquite

Mesquite grows primarily in the Southern United states and is known for being a very hard and durable wood. The sapwood tends to be pale while the heartwood is reddish brown. Mesquite usually contains lots of knotholes and a smooth finish is recommended.